Tuesday Tip: Lightening and brightening a formula using XL-Cream

Every once in awhile a client will tell me they like their color but wish I would make it just a little lighter.

When I want to make a color formula a little lighter I add XL-Cream. It doesn’t change the tone of the color, it just makes it a lighter.

Following are 2 examples, one using 4G permanent and the second using 2RO permanent.

The first photo shows the color full strength, the second shows the color diluted with 15g of XC-Cream and the third photo shows the color diluted with equal parts of XL-Cream.

Starting points
4G-chromastics
4G-30g-chromastics
4G-45g-chromastics
2RO-chromastics
2RO-30g-chromastics
2RO-45g-chromastics

Each photo shows the color on both natural white hair and on light brown hair with 50% gray.

All the swatches were processed with 20-volume developer and timed for 35 minutes.

If you haven’t tried Chromastics yet, give us a call. It’s the most versatile color you’ll ever work with.

Give me a call if you have questions.

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Tuesday Tip: Better High-Lift Blonde

Better High-Lift Blonde Hair Color

Every high-lift blonde I’ve ever worked with leaves the hair rough and brassy. The fault, I believe, is in the way they are created. Most high-lift blondes have an ammonia content of 4% and use double amounts of 40-volume This means you have a working volume of 26.66.

I decided to create chromastics high-lift differently.

Chromastics high-lift (XL-Super) has an ammonia content of 3% and uses equal amounts of 40-volume developer. This means you have a working volume of 20.00. The combination of 3% ammonia and a working volume of 20.00 is much less aggressive that an ammonia content of 4% and a working volume of 26.66.

Here are 2 dye outs on virgin white and virgin salt and pepper hair that show the final result.

Virgin Swatches

#1 Virgin Swatches

Final level Dark Blonde

#2 – Final level Dark Blonde

45g of XL-Super + 15g of 3N + 60g of 40-volume developer

Final level Medium Blonde

#3 – Final level Medium Blonde

45g of XL-Super + 15g of 4N + 60g of 40-volume developer

In each formula the darker starting level is diluted by the XL-Super and more importantly, there is no brassiness and there is complete gray coverage.

Give me a call if you have questions.

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Tuesday Tip: Three ways to create ash shades

Tuesday Tip: Three ways to create ash shades

The first swatch is permanent 60g of 6N with 20-volume developer, processed for 35 minutes.

The second swatch is the same formula with 6g of green concentrate. This is best when you want a soft ash result meaning not all the warmth is neutralized. It’s very good on lighter brown salt and pepper hair.

The third swatch is the original formula with 3g of green concentrate + 1.5g (1 and 1/2 inch) of blue concentrate. It’s best when you want ash with almost no warmth coming through.

The fourth swatch is the original formula with 3G of blue concentrate. This gives smokey a result that is best for darker brown hair with little gray.

Give me a call if you have questions.

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Tuesday Tip: SuperGlaze for Salt & Pepper Hair

I like to use SuperGlaze formulas on salt & pepper hair to get more of a blend instead of solid coverage. A SuperGlaze also allows me to use a much lighter shade than I normally would without creating brassiness.

You create a SuperGlaze by mixing equal parts of permanent and Deposit-Only with 20-volume developer. It’s processed from 20 to 30 minutes.

superglaze1This first photo shows the hair before it was colored. I started with both all white hair and 50/50 light brown and white.
Photo 2 shows both swatches treated with permanent 8N and 20-volume developer and processed for 35 minutes.
Photo 3 shows an 8N + D8N SuperGlaze
Photo 4 shows an 8N + D8RO Superglaze, the white hair becomes lightest natural strawberry
Photo 5 Shows an 8N + D8BV SuperGlaze, the white hair becomes pink gray (not recommended)
Photo 6 shows an 8N + D8GB SuperGlaze, the white hair becomes nutmeg

Photo 7 shows an 8N + D8G SuperGlaze, the white hair becomes light golden neutral

Give me a call if you have questions.

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Tuesday Tip: Gone wild for toners!

Our industry has gone wild for toners. Unfortunately, most toners fade or go off tone within a week.

Tuesday Tips from Tom Dispenza of Chromastics

Here are 5 new pastel toner shades you can mix from your existing chromastics colors that are long lasting and won’t go off tone. Each of these was applied to hair that was lightened to pale yellow and processed for 20 minutes.

  • #1 Carrot: 60g D8ro + 6g Red Concentrate + 60g 10-volume developer
  • #2 Lilac: 8g D8BV + 6g D4RV + 40g Clear + 54g 10-volume developer
  • #3 Champagne: 16g D10GB + 4g D10BV _40g Clear +60g 10-volume developer
  • #4 Peach: 8g D8GB + 8g D8RO + 40g Clear + 56g 10-volume developer
  • #5 Blueberry: 60g D8BV + 4g Blue Concentrate
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Tuesday Tip: The difference between translucent and opaque

Tuesday Tip: The difference between translucent and opaque

Carefully look at these 4 glasses.

Although they are all light brown, 4a is clearly the lightest and 4d is clearly the deepest.

This is the difference between translucent and opaque.

This slight difference is achieved by using a concentrate and helps you to get better gray coverage and longer wearing results. The more concentrate you add, the deeper the color becomes but remains the same level. (Yes, you can add too much.)

Concentrates are available in Neutral, Green, Gold, Red and Blue and each alters color in a specific way.

I used Gold for this demonstration.

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